Categories
Industrial Design

Components Face : LED screen with eyes Arms: SCARA robot arm Navigation: Robot L

Components
Face : LED screen with eyes
Arms: SCARA robot arm
Navigation: Robot Legs
Motor: stepper motor Wheels: Meccanum wheels Note that It’s not a question, It’s combination of components on autodesk inventor. I don’t want them combined each component separate folder.
Material to be used ABS Resin. You understand the mechanism I want. Robot arm must have stepper motor shaft pulley all this and same goes to the legs.
Not autocad. Should be Inventor and should be 3D not 2D.
Calculate all the dimensions because we didn’t know how to do it.
Height of the robot not more than 1.5 meters.
It should look like the one I have attached but I don’t want to assemble all together. I want each component seperate folder. I also attached the robot arm. Kindly make it neat and presentable and also don’t forget to calculate the dimensions.

Categories
Industrial Design

Explain this concept.

9.1 Define the following terms:
Path
Activity
Early start
Early finish
Late start
Late finish
Forward pass
Backward pass
Node
AON
Float or Slack
Critical path
PERT
9.8 What is the time estimate of an activity in which the optimistic estimate is 4 days, pessimistic is 12 days, and most likely is 5 days? Show your work.
9.10 Attached
10.2 The advantage of Gantt charts lies in their linkage to the project schedule baseline. Explain this concept.
10.10 attached
11.5 What are the advantages and disadvantages of Agile PM?
11.16 attached

Categories
Industrial Design

What should kate’s next steps be?

1. 6.1 This chapter discussed the characteristics of high-­performing project teams. List the factors that characterize these teams and give examples of each one.
2. CASE STUDY 6.3 Johnson & Rogers Software Engineering, Inc.
Kate Thomas, a project manager with Johnson & Rogers Software Engineering, was looking forward to her first project team “meeting.” She applied quotes to the term “meeting” because she would not actually be sitting down at a table with any of the other members of the project team. She had been assigned responsibility for a large software development project that would be using team members from both inside and outside the organization, none of whom were currently employed at the same Redlands, California office where she worked. In fact, as she ticked off the names on the legal pad in front of her, she did not know whether to be impressed or apprehensive with the project she was about to kick off.
Vignish Ramanujam (senior programmer)—New Delhi, India
Anders Blomquist (systems designer)—Uppsala, Sweden
Sally Dowd (systems engineer)—Atlanta, Georgia
Penny Jones (junior programmer)—Bristol, England
Patrick Flynn (junior programmer)—San Antonio, Texas
Erik Westerveldt (subcontractor)—Pretoria, South Africa
Toshiro Akame (customer representative)—Kyoto, Japan
The challenge with this team, Kate quickly realized, was going to involve figuring out how to create an integrated project team with these people, most of whom she had never dealt with before. Although Sally and Patrick worked for Johnson & Rogers at other plant locations, the rest of the team were strangers. Erik, from South Africa, was critical for the project because his company had developed some of the specialized processes the project required and was to be treated as an industrial partner. The other members of the team had been assembled either by Erik or through contacts with senior members of her own firm. She did not know, but would soon discover, how they felt about the project and their level of commitment to it.
The first virtual project meeting was scheduled to start promptly at 9 am Pacific Standard Time. That led to the first problem. As Kate stared at the camera mounted above the video monitor, she kept glancing down at the screen for signs that other members of the team had logged on. Finally, at 9:15, she was joined by Sally, with Toshiro logging in shortly afterward. As they chatted and continued to wait for other members to log on, time continued to pass. When, at 9:30 no one else had signed on, Kate asked the secretary to start making phone calls to verify that other members of the team were trying to access the system. Eventually, by 10:25, the team consisted of five members: Anders, Sally, Penny, Patrick, and Toshiro. It was decided that for the sake of getting something accomplished, those who were logged on would get started. The agenda that Kate had prepared and e-mailed out the day before was produced and the meeting began. Within 10 minutes, the video link to Penny was suddenly lost. The other team members waited for five minutes, waiting in various states of impatience for Penny to rejoin the meeting. There was still no sign of Vignish or Erik.
The meeting quickly bogged down on technical details as those in attendance realized that several technical issues could not be resolved without input from the missing team members. Though he tried his best to hide it, it became apparent that Toshiro in particular was frustrated with the lack of progress in this ­meeting. Kate suggested that they adjourn until 11, while she made another attempt to contact the missing members, but Toshiro objected, saying, “That is 3 am in my country. It is now past midnight here. I have been here today for 15 hours and I would like to get home.” It was finally agreed to reconvene tomorrow at the same time. Toshiro agreed, but with bad grace: “Can we not find a time that is more accommodating to my schedule?” Kate promised to look into the matter.
The next day’s meeting was a mixed success. Although everyone managed to log on to the system within a reasonable period, Penny’s connection kept going down, to the exasperation of Vignish, the senior programmer. Although the meeting was conducted with great politeness by all parties, it was equally clear that no one was willing to offer their candid opinions of the project, the goals, and how the team was expected to execute their assignments. After asking members of the team for honest feedback and getting little response, Kate dropped the point. In addition, she had a nagging feeling that there was some unspoken animosity between Patrick and Sally due to the manner in which they interacted with each other.
After some general goal setting and a discussion of team responsibilities, Kate asked if there was a time when they could next meet. In the general silence that followed, Anders spoke up, asking, “Well, how often do you hope to meet like this? To be honest, it is inconvenient for me to attend these sessions regularly, as our telecom equipment is in Stockholm and I have to drive an hour each way.”
Toshiro spoke up as well. “I am sorry to repeat this point,” he said, “but these meeting times are extremely inconvenient for me. Could we not find a time that is more generally acceptable?”
Kate replied, “Well, how about 5 pm my time. That’s . . . ,” Kate paused and quickly consulted her personal planner, “9 in the morning for you.”
This suggestion was met by a wave of objections, with the first from Penny who stated, “Uh, Kate, that would be 1 am here in England.”
No sooner had she spoken than Anders, Erik, and Vignish chimed in, “Kate, that’s 2 am in Stockholm and Pretoria,” and “Kate, are you aware that that is 6 am here in New Delhi?”
Back and forth the team members argued, trying to find a reasonable time they could all meet. Finally, after going around the group several times to work out a mutually agreeable time for these teleconferences, Erik spoke up: “Maybe we don’t all need to meet at the same time, anyway. Kate, why don’t you just schedule meetings with each of us as you need to talk?”
Kate objected by saying, “Erik, the whole point of these teleconferences is to get the team together, not to hold one-on-one meetings with each of you.”
Erik responded, “Well, all I know is that this is only the first videoconference and already it is becoming a burden.”
Penny spoke up, “You’re lucky. At least your system works. Mine keeps going up and down at this end.”
“Okay, how about just using e-mails?” suggested Erik. “That way it does not matter what the time is at our location.”
The other team members agreed that this idea made sense and seemed on the verge of endorsing the use of e-mails for communications. At this point, Kate stepped back into the discussion and stated firmly, “Look, that won’t do. We need the opportunity to talk together. E-mails won’t do that.”
More arguing ensued. Eventually, the team members signed off, agreeing that they needed to “talk further” about these issues. Kate’s reaction was one of disappointment and frustration. She sensed reluctance among the other members of the team to talk about these issues and to use the videoconferencing system in the manner she had envisioned. As Kate sat down to lunch that noon, she pondered how she should proceed from here.
Questions
How would you advise Kate to proceed? Analyze the conversation she had this morning. What went right? What went wrong?
What should Kate’s next steps be?
How can she use the technology of the Internet and teleconferencing to enhance team development and performance?
3. 7.1 Do you agree with the following statement: “With proper planning, it is possible to eliminate most/all risks from a project”? Why or why not?
4. 7.10 Consider the following observation: “The problem with risk analysis is that it is possible to imagine virtually anything going wrong on a project. Where do you draw the line? In other words, how far do you take risk analysis before it becomes overkill?” How would you respond?
5. Attached file 7.14
6. 8.2 How has the global economy affected the importance of cost estimation and cost control for many project organizations?
7. 8.3 Why is cost estimation such an important component of project planning? Discuss how it links together with the Work Breakdown Structure and the project schedule.
8. Attached File 8.13
9. Attached file 8.19

Categories
Industrial Design

When john’s individual needs could not be met, the group atmosphere and task completion suffered.

CASE STUDY 4.4 Problems with John
John James has worked at one of the world’s largest aerospace firms for more than 15 years. He was hired into the division during the Clinton years when many people were being brought onto the payroll. John had not completed his engineering degree, so he was hired as a publisher. Most of the other people in his department who were hired at the time had completed their degrees and therefore began careers as associate engineers. Over the years, John has progressed through the ranks to the classification of engineer. Many of the employees hired at the same time as John have advanced more rapidly because the corporation recognized their engineering degrees as prerequisites for advancement. Years of service can be substituted, but a substantial number of years is required to offset the lack of a degree.
John began exhibiting signs of dissatisfaction with the corporation in general several years ago. He would openly vent his feelings against nearly everything the corporation was doing or trying to do. However, he did not complain about his specific situation. The complaining became progressively worse. John started to exhibit mood swings. He would be extremely productive at times (though still complaining) and then swing into periods of near zero productivity. During these times, John would openly surf the Internet for supplies for a new home repair project or for the most recent Dilbert comics. His fellow employees were hesitant to point out to management when these episodes occurred. Most of the team members had been working together for the entire 15 years and had become close friends. This is why these nonproductive episodes of John’s were such a problem; no one on the team felt comfortable pointing the problem out to higher management. As time progressed and John’s friends evolved into his managers while he remained at lower salary grades, John’s mood swings grew more dramatic and lasted longer.
During the most recent performance appraisal review, John’s manager (a friend of his) included a paragraph concerning his “lack of concentration at times.” This was included because of numerous comments made by John’s peers. The issue could no longer be swept under the rug. John became irate at the review feedback and refused to acknowledge receipt of his performance appraisal. His attitude toward his teammates became extremely negative. He demanded to know who had spoken negatively about him, and his work output diminished to virtually nothing.
Analysis of the Problem
Clearly John has not been happy. To understand why, the history of his employment at this company needs to be looked at in greater detail. The group of coworkers that started together 15 years earlier all had similar backgrounds and capabilities. A group of eight people were all about 22 years old and had just left college; John was the only exception to this pattern as he still needed two years of schooling to finish his engineering degree. All were single and making good money at their jobs. The difference in salary levels between an associate engineer and a publishsman was quite small. Figure 4.5 shows the salary grade classifications at this corporation.
FIGURE 4.5 Salary Grade Classifications at This Corporation
Figure 4.5 Full Alternative Text
This group played softball together every Wednesday, fished together on the weekends, and hunted elk for a week every winter. Lifelong bonds and friendships were formed. One by one, the group started to get married and begin families. They even took turns standing up for each other at the weddings. The wives and the children all became great friends, and the fishing trips were replaced with family backyard barbecues.
Meanwhile, things at work were going great. All these friends and coworkers had very strong work ethics and above-average abilities. They all liked their work and did not mind working extra hours. This combination of effort and ability meant rewards and advancement for those involved. However, since John had not yet completed his degree as he had planned, his promotions were more difficult to achieve and did not occur as rapidly as those of his friends. The differences in salary and responsibility started to expand at a rapid rate. John started to become less satisfied.
This large corporation was structured as a functional organization. All mechanical engineers reported to a functional department manager. This manager was aware of the situation and convinced John to go back for his degree during the evenings. Although John had good intentions, he never stayed with it long enough to complete his degree. As John’s friends advanced more quickly through the corporation, their cars and houses also became bigger and better. John’s wife pressured him to keep up with the others, and they also bought a bigger house. This move meant that John was living above his means and his financial security was threatened.
Until this point, John had justified in his mind that the corporation’s policies and his functional manager were the source of all his problems. John would openly vent his anger about this manager. Then a drastic change took place in the corporation. The corporation switched over to a project team environment and eliminated the functional management. This meant that John was now reporting directly to his friends.
Even though John now worked for his friends, company policy was still restrictive and the promotions did not come as fast as he hoped. The team leader gave John frequent cash spot awards and recognition in an attempt to motivate him. John’s ego would be soothed for a short time, but this did not address the real problem. John wanted money, power, and respect, and he was not satisfied because those around him had more. Although he was good at what he did, he was not great at it. He did not appear to have the innate capability to develop into a leader through expert knowledge or personality traits. Additionally, due to the lack of an engineering degree, he could not achieve power through time in grade. By now, John’s attitude had deteriorated to the point where it was disruptive to the team and something had to be done. The team leader had to help John, but he also had to look after the health of the team.
This detailed history is relevant because it helps to explain how John’s attitude slowly deteriorated over a period of time. At the start of his career, John was able to feel on a par with his peers. When everyone was young and basically equal, he knew that he had the respect of his friends and coworkers. This allowed John to enjoy a sense of self-esteem. As time passed and he gave up in his attempt at the college degree, he lost some of his self-esteem. As the gap grew between his friends’ positions in the company and his position in the company, he perceived that he lost the esteem of others. Finally, when he became overextended with the larger home, even his basic security was threatened. It is difficult to maintain a level of satisfaction in this situation. The problem was now distracting the team and starting to diminish their efforts and results. Because of the friendships, undue pressure was being placed on the team as they tried to protect John from the consequences of his actions.
The team leader had to try to resolve this problem. The challenge was significant: the leader had to attempt to satisfy the individual’s needs, the group’s needs, and the task needs. When John’s individual needs could not be met, the group atmosphere and task completion suffered. It was time for the team leader to act decisively and approach upper management with a solution to the problem.
Possible Courses of Action
The team leader put a lot of thought into his options. Because of the friendships and personal connections, he knew that he could not make this decision lightly. He decided to talk individually to the team members who were John’s close friends and then determine the best solution to present to upper management.
After talking with the team members, the team leader decided on the following list of potential options:
Do nothing.
Bypass company policy and promote John.
Talk John into going back to college.
Relocate John to a different project team.
Terminate John’s employment.
The option to do nothing would be the easiest way out for the team leader, but this would not solve any problems. This decision would be the equivalent of burying one’s head in the sand and hoping the problem would go away by itself. Surprisingly, this was a common suggestion from the team members. There appeared to be a hope that the problem could be overlooked, as it had been in the past, and John would just accept the situation. With this option, the only person who would have to compromise was John.
The second option of bypassing company policy and promoting John to a higher level would be a very difficult sell to management. John was recently promoted to a salary grade 18 (his friends were now 24s and 26s). This promotion was achieved through the concerted efforts of his friends and the team leader. The chances of convincing management to approve another promotion so quickly were extremely low. Furthermore, if the team leader was successful at convincing management to promote John, what would the long-term benefits be? John would still not be at the same level as his friends and might not be satisfied for long. Chances were good that this would be only a temporary fix to the problem. After the shine wore off the promotion, John would again believe that his efforts exceeded his rewards. It would be nice to believe that this solution would eliminate the problem, but history seemed to indicate otherwise.
The third option of trying to talk John into going back to college and finishing his engineering degree would be the best solution to the problem, but probably the least likely to occur. If John could complete his degree, there would be no company policies that could obstruct his path. He would then be competing on an even playing field. This would allow him to justifiably receive his advancement and recapture his self-esteem. If he did not receive the rewards that he felt he deserved, he would then have to look at his performance and improve on his weaknesses, not just fall back on the same old excuse. This solution would appear to put John back on the path to job satisfaction, but the problem with it was that it had been tried unsuccessfully several times before. Why would it be different this time? Should the corporation keep trying this approach knowing that failure would again lead to dissatisfaction and produce a severe negative effect on the team? Although this third solution could produce the happy ending that everyone wants to see in a movie, it did not have a very high probability of success.
The fourth option of relocating John to a different team would be an attempt to break the ties of competition that John felt with his friends and teammates. If this option were followed, John could start with a clean slate with a completely different team, and he would be allowed to save face with his friends. He could tell them of his many accomplishments and the great job that he is doing, while complaining that his new boss is holding him back. Although this could be considered smoke and mirrors, it might allow John the opportunity to see himself in a new light. If he performs at his capabilities, he should be able to achieve the esteem of others and eventually his self-esteem. The team would consider this a victory because it would allow everyone to maintain the social relationships while washing their hands of the professional problems. This option offered the opportunity to make the situation impersonal. It should be clear, however, that this solution would do nothing to resolve the true problem. Although it would allow John to focus his dissatisfaction on someone other than his friends and give him a fresh start to impress his new coworkers, who is to say that the problem would not simply resurface?
The fifth option, termination of employment, would be distasteful to all involved. Nothing to this point had indicated that John would deserve an action this severe. Also, since this option also would sever the social relationships for all involved and cause guilt for all the remaining team members, resulting in team output deteriorating even further, it would be exercised only if other options failed and the situation deteriorated to an unsafe condition for those involved.
Questions
1. As the team leader, you have weighed the pros and cons of the five options and prepared a presentation to management on how to address this problem. What do you suggest?
2. Consider each of the options, and develop an argument to defend your position for each option.

Categories
Industrial Design

Explain the process and how this business implemented Lean, Six Sigma, or Lean Six Sigma to its success or failure.

You will review articles or a brief case study of a company that has been successful or failing in Lean, Six Sigma, or Lean Six Sigma implementation. In your writing, you will provide at least one selected business and indicate these major items:
-Introduction of selected business and its products/services
– Describe LSS goals, values, and their impact to this selected business
-Explain the process and how this business implemented Lean, Six Sigma, or Lean Six Sigma to its success or failure.
-Summarizing tools and applications used in the process
-Your thoughts (critique) on the article/case
-Reference, APA style 5th or the latest edition.
Your writing should be 1-2 pages (Time NW, 12, single space).

Categories
Industrial Design

Skill Building exercise 6A is an exercise (page 220) on the Pert Chart. This is one of the more common and useful tools used in business. Without prior exposure, the first time most people see it they will need some clarification to understand all that it represents. While business and managers use many tools, one of the most common and useful is the Pert Chart. Build the Pert Chart described in your textbook and attach it to this assignment along with the answers to the two questions in the Break Even ana

Skill Building exercise 6A is an exercise (page 220) on the Pert Chart. This is one of the more common and useful tools used in business. Without prior exposure, the first time most people see it they will need some clarification to understand all that it represents. While business and managers use many tools, one of the most common and useful is the Pert Chart. Build the Pert Chart described in your textbook and attach it to this assignment along with the answers to the two questions in the Break Even analysis based on the problem as outlined below.
Break Even Analysis:
On a recent vacation trip to Juarez, Mexico, you noticed a small store and street vendors selling original art. The prices ranged from $3 to $25 U.S. A flash of inspiration hit you, why not sell Mexican art back home in the U.S. using a van as your store? Every three months you could drive the 350 miles to Mexico and load up on art. You anticipate that you could negotiate generous large-quantity discounts from the Mexican vendors.
Back in the U.S., you could park your van on busy streets or nearby parks, wherever you could obtain a permit. You think the only advertising needed would be to display the art outside the van. Your intention is to operate your traveling art sale about 12 hours per week. If you can make enough money from your business, you could attend classes full time during the day.
You intend to sell the original painting at an average of $15 a unit. Based on preliminary analysis, you have discovered that your primary fixed costs per month would be: $500 for payment on a van, $125 for gas and maintenance, $50 for insurance, and $45 for a street vendor’s permit. You will also be driving to Mexico every three months at $400 per trip, resulting in a $133.33 per month travel cost. Your variable costs would be an average of $5 per painting and 45 cents for wrapping each painting in brown paper.
Question 1: How many paintings will you have to sell each month before you start to make a profit?
Question 2: If the average cost of your paintings rises to $8, how many pieces of art will you have to sell each month if you hold your price to $15 per unit?
• Make sure that you provide your calculations along with your answer (with proper units). If you work out the answer without the text’s formula, go back and work through the problem again using it. You need to show your work so that the instructor can clearly see you can run the problem.

Categories
Industrial Design

Research the assigned issue specific to manufacturing as assigned by the instructor. Describe the issue fully in three distinct areas:What is the issue and how does it affect manufacturing productivity?

Research the assigned issue specific to manufacturing as assigned by the instructor.
Describe the issue fully in three distinct areas:What is the issue and how does it affect manufacturing productivity? This is the topical part of the paper and requires 4-6 pages with 4+ resources.
How is this issue being addressed in manufacturing today? This part of the paper requires 4-6 pages with 4+ resources separate from your topical resources.
If you were the manager with the responsibility for addressing this issue within your manufacturing facility what would you do? This part of the paper is where you would fully explain what actions you would take as a manager to meet the demands created by this issue. It requires 6-10 pages with 3+ resource additional resources.
Your paper should have 11+ resources and be 14 pages minimum plus your summary, table of contents, abstract, and cover page.
In other words, find a problem specific to a manufacturing facility, propose a solution to the problem, and provide sufficient evidence that your solution will be successful if implemented. The paper will be prepared using the 7th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) and the text must be at least 20 pages long and must include a “summary and conclusions” of at least one page. All topics must be approved by the instructor. Further, investigative reports and book reports are not the same things. This paper should conclude with your conclusions on the actions that should be taken rather than the actions that were taken and your paper should provide the documentation to support that conclusion. The strength of that argument will constitute the bulk of your final grade on the term paper.
Your paper should have:
1 – Cover page
2 – Table of contents
3 – Abstract
3 – At least 14 pages of text (APA style assumes double-spaced format)
4 – At least 1 page of summary or conclusion
For other format specifications, please follow the APA style manual. (Please note that points will be deducted for the paper that does not follow the APA format). Click below to see a sample of APA 7 Professional Paper:

Categories
Industrial Design

In a paragraph or two, describe the skills and abilities for your dream job and set a goal to attain these skills in less than five years. Summarize this position in a paragraph or more. Why would you want to work for this company in this role?

In a paragraph or two, describe the skills and abilities for your dream job and set a goal to attain these skills in less than five years. Summarize this position in a paragraph or more. Why would you want to work for this company in this role?

Categories
Industrial Design

Explain the process and how this business implemented Lean, Six Sigma, or Lean Six Sigma to its success or failure.

You will review articles or a brief case study of a company that has been successful or failing in Lean, Six Sigma, or Lean Six Sigma implementation. In your writing, you will provide at least one selected business and indicate these major items:
-Introduction of selected business and its products/services
– Describe LSS goals, values, and their impact to this selected business
-Explain the process and how this business implemented Lean, Six Sigma, or Lean Six Sigma to its success or failure.
-Summarizing tools and applications used in the process
-Your thoughts (critique) on the article/case
-Reference, APA style 5th or the latest edition.
Your writing should be 1-2 pages (Time NW, 12, single space).

Categories
Industrial Design

CAD/ CAM technologies to design and manufacturing mechanism/ machines.

CAD/ CAM technologies to design and manufacturing mechanism/ machines.