Categories
Real Estate

This week we will be discussing the final walkthrough before closing. Read The B

This week we will be discussing the final walkthrough before closing. Read The Balance’s article by Elizabeth Weintraub, “Tips for Doing the Final Walkthrough Before Closing on a Home” (attached). In it, Elizabeth stresses the point that final walkthroughs aren’t home inspections… nor are they a time to begin negotiations with the seller to do repairs.” Reflect on the information in the article, then give your thoughts on a few questions. Here we go…
A point is made that buyers may be tempted to pass on the final walkthrough. What would you say to your clients to have them reconsider that stance?
Scenario #1: You do the final walkthrough with your client and find that some of the agreed upon repairs the seller agreed to have done… weren’t. How would you approach this situation?
Scenario #2: The home inspection showed no blaring issues, but you do the walkthrough two-days before closing and you find a problem. How would you address this with your client, the buyer? The seller and their agent? My discussion boards are opinion oriented. That being said, remember net etiquette and be sure to provide a brief explanation/justification for your viewpoint. There is no right or wrong answer to these questions, just your personal, thoughtful response.
Also remember to respond to one of your classmates. That part is 40% of this grade… Good luck!

Categories
Writing

Please answer the following questions for the case study. If this case is your o

Please answer the following questions for the case study. If this case is your one longer write up- please answer each question, 1-2 page bullet point write up will suffice. Please submit BEFORE class.
1. How would you define the IKEA situation in your country? What is your own experience with the brand?
2. Do you think that IKEA is effectively communicating its global positioning in different countries?
3. Discuss the major challenges IKEA faces moving forward?

Categories
Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice: Emergency Management Briefing Presentation Assignment Content

Criminal Justice: Emergency Management Briefing Presentation
Assignment Content
Communication
with the public is a key element of disaster response. In this
assignment, imagine you are a new member of a public safety team in the
municipal government and youve been tasked with preparing a briefing
presentation to introduce emergency management to the community.
Create a 5-slide Microsoft® PowerPoint presentation introducing community nembers to emergency management Include
information and examples that address the following questions:
* How is emergency management defined?
What are the major theories of emergency management?What is the history of emergency management?
* Why is emergency management important for the community?
Include
speaker notes, a cover slide, an introduction slide that highlights the
presentation’s major points, a conclusion slide that recaps the main
points, and a reference slide. Requirements: 1. APA 7th Edition 2. Minimum of 2-3 References w/in 5 years old 3. Consist of 5 body pages PLUS Title Page & Reference Page 4. Speakers Notes on all slides
4. NO PLAGIARISM

Categories
Business

Create a Dashboard to provide insight about your data. Use the Nielsen data prov

Create a Dashboard to provide insight about your data.
Use the Nielsen data provided from the link below:
NIELSEN TOPLINE RATINGS FOR SUBSCRIBING RADIO STATIONS
Select radio market data from 1- 3 Florida markets (cities). Example: Walton Beach – Destin, FL
Export the data into an Excel spreadsheet, labeling the content by market/city.
Part A: Add a PivotTable to display summary data.
Create value fields
Create row dimensions
Add a basic filter for Model
Insert a Slider for Months
Insert a Timeline for Date
Use “Format as Table” to format the PivotTable using colors of your choice. (Several PivotTable styles are available to choose from).
Note: In a Pivot Table report, the dimensions are the descriptive attributes used for labeling, grouping, and aggregating the data – for example, Type and Date. The measures are the numeric data points that can be used in mathematical operations; for example, sales, quantity, etc.
Part B: For this part, you are required to perform only one of the following activities:
Add a PivotChart to provide additional insight about your data. You choose the appropriate dimension(s) and measure(s), and you choose the layout and design.
Ensure that your PivotChart is relevant and is able to answer questions about your data.
Add a Pie Chart to provide additional insight about your data. You choose the appropriate dimension(s) and measure(s), and you choose the layout and design. Ensure that your PivotChart is relevant and is able to answer questions about your data.
Add a Bar Graph to show the top category of products, providing additional insight about your data. You choose the appropriate dimension(s) and measure(s), and you choose the layout and design. Ensure that your PivotChart is relevant and is able to answer questions about your data.
Add a Line Graph to provide additional insight about your data. You choose the appropriate dimension(s) and measure(s), and you choose the layout and design.
Ensure that your PivotChart is relevant and is able to answer questions about your data.
Consider the following:
This is an individual assignment.
Upload one file (in Microsoft Excel format) to this assignment area.
Pay attention to the rubric.
Due: Sunday 11/27/22 at 11:59 p.m.

Categories
English

Instructions Contribute your primary post to our discussion by Thursday, 11:59 p

Instructions
Contribute your primary post to our discussion by Thursday, 11:59 p.m. (but now is good!). In your post please include the following:
Learning how to work with the limitations of your Short-Term Memory is important for many aspects of your life. Please answer the following:
Please tell us what the main difference is regarding a Within Subjects Design and a Between Subjects Design
Give an example of a benefit and a drawback of using a Within Design
Give an example of a benefit and a drawback of using a Between Design

Categories
Writing

Scenario 1: Maria is a 13-year-old biracial student whose mother is Hispanic and

Scenario 1:
Maria is a 13-year-old biracial student whose mother is Hispanic and father is African-American. Maria’s father transferred towns for work, which uprooted the family midyear from a large city to a small, rural town. Maria’s new school, much like the community, is predominately white and middle class. The move has resulted in her parents fighting a lot, making her home life very stressful.
Additionally, students at her new school dress much differently than students at her old school, which makes Maria stand out. Some of the other students make fun of the way she dresses. She just discovered a social media group called “I Hate Maria” composed of some of her seventh-grade classmates, who have been posting negative comments about her. Recently, students at Maria’s school took cell phone photographs of her buttocks while she was walking in the hall and posted them on the “I Hate Maria” website.
Maria has tried to tell her parents about the bullying at school, but they tell her she is being too sensitive. With all of the stress, Maria is plagued by dark thoughts of killing herself and cannot focus on the lessons being taught in her classes. A. Summarize the social context described in the scenario, including the following:
Maria’s family
Maria’s community
Maria’s cultural background
B. Discuss how you, as a teacher, would try to help Maria in a culturally responsive, trauma-informed way by doing the following:
1. Describe a realistic action you would take to help Maria with one or more of the issues she is facing.
a. Justify how the action from part B1 would effectively address the issue or issues from part B1 in a culturally responsive and trauma-informed way, including specific examples.
2. Discuss how you would involve Maria’s family in this action.
C. Acknowledge sources, using in-text citations and references, for content that is quoted, paraphrased, or summarized
Scenario 2:
Denise, an eighth-grade student aged 14, was diagnosed with a learning disability in the area of reading when she was in the second grade. She has struggled in school academically and socially. As a young child, she was molested by a friend of her father over the course of two years. Her parents divorced after she told them about this. Denise has been having romantic thoughts about other girls and recently told her parents that she is a lesbian. Her father was accepting of the news, but her mother has rejected Denise based on her religious faith. Denise’s mother is pushing Denise to attend church to “fix” her thoughts and feelings. Denise has begun to do self-harm through cutting. She has attempted suicide twice.
While at school, Denise tends to withdraw and refuses to participate in class. She currently is not passing any of her classes and is in danger of retention. Denise struggles with relationships with other students and staff at school. She has tried to seek out relationships with other female students only to be rejected. She misinterprets any compassion or concern from female adults, leading Denise to believe she has romantic feelings for the adult.
A. Identify your chosen scenario, and describe two issues the student in that scenario is encountering.
B. Discuss how you would appropriately respond to the issues identified in part A by doing the following:
1. Describe how, as a teacher, you could respond to and address the issues in a sensitive, culturally responsive way.
2. Explain one relevant legal obligation and one relevant privacy concern that must be considered as you respond to the identified issues.
3. Describe relevant strategies for collaborating with the student’s caregivers to address the identified issues.
a. Justify your chosen strategies and why they would be effective.
4. Identify additional stakeholders, and explain why they should be involved in addressing the identified issues.
C. Acknowledge sources, using in-text citations and references, for content that is quoted, paraphrased, or summarized. Scenario 3: A. Identify the hypothetical scenario (STUDENT SUICIDE) you selected and explain the context, including each of the following:
what happened
who was involved
examples of the impact on the community
examples of how the situation impacts students at home
examples of how the situation impacts students at school
B. Describe a strategy you would use to help students cope with the scenario from part A.
1. Justify why your strategy would be effective in helping students cope with the scenario at school and at home.
2. Explain one anticipated challenge you might encounter as you implement this strategy in your classroom.
3. Explain how you will overcome this challenge. Include specific examples to support your explanation.
C. Acknowledge sources, using in-text citations and references, for content that is quoted, paraphrased, or summarized.

Categories
English

What is stress? Give examples of the four basic types of stress. List and define

What is stress? Give examples of the four basic types of stress.
List and define some of the more commonly used defense mechanisms. What are the two primary characteristics of defense mechanisms? What is PTSD?
List and explain the three characteristics of hardy people. How do optimistic and pessimistic people differ in their reaction to stressful events? Explain resilience (hardiness) in relation to stress.
Write 8 different paragraphs for each question, a total of 24 paragraphs

Categories
Economics

Choose any topic discussed in the managerial economics class and write a 5 page

Choose any topic discussed in the managerial economics class and write a 5 page essay with the
following specifications.
1. Typed – Double spaced
2. Font Size – 11 or 12
3. Margins – 1 inch (top, bottom, right and left)
4. APA formatting
5. References included
The paper should consist of the following:
(a) A discussion on your selected topic covering the main points.
(b) At least one news article related to the chosen topic, showing the application of the concept
in the real world. You can easily find such news articles on the web.
(c) Write in your own words what you have understood from the article(s) and how this relates
to what you have learned in the Econ class.
Outline
1. Introduction
2. The Basics of Managerial Economics
3. Managerial Decisions in Production and Costs
4. Firm Organization and Market Structure
5. Pricing with Market Power, Part I
6. Pricing with Market Power, Part II
7. Oligopoly Models
8. Linear Programming
9. Managerial Decisions Using Game Theory

Categories
Marketing

Instructions:This week you will look at misleading information that you are expo

Instructions:This week you will look at misleading information that you are exposed to every day. Find an example of a survey or poll or even a tweet that you think might be misleading.
How would you support your conclusions? You want to use statistical reasoning here not personal opinion. Places to look might be online polls where anyone can answer. If the title of a survey is misleading, how would you correct it?
Was the sample representative? Be sure to read the methodology of a survey and not only the responses to the questions. For example, you may think the sampling was not representative of the population, but you have to discuss how sampling was actually done to support your claim. Another place to look are articles written by people who clearly don’t understand statistics but use legitimate data like the example below.
The title of the article, New Low of 49% in U.S. Say Death Penalty Applied Fairly (https://news.gallup.com/poll/243794/new-low-say-death-penalty-applied-fairly.aspx Links to an external site.), is misleading because 49% is the point estimate. You have to click on survey methods at the bottom to find the margin of error was 4%. This means the true percentage in the population could have been as low as 45% but as high as 53%. Therefore the title of the article is very misleading. After locating your inaccurate poll or article, respond to the following questions.
How did the poll or article misrepresent the facts? How might you rewrite the title of the article more accurately?
What was the author trying to get you to think? Why? What could be the ramifications of believing false information?
Find and describe an article that refutes this information, if possible.
Have you ever been sent articles that you believed just by reading the title? What was the result?
Please be sure to validate your opinions and ideas with citations and references in APA format.

Categories
Biology

Introduction Objectives 1. To understand the concept of species diversity, inc

Introduction
Objectives
1. To understand the concept of species diversity, including the contribution of both species richness and “evenness” to it.
2. To understand some of the ways in which species diversity is measured and/or quantitatively modeled.
3. To understand the relationship between species diversity and area sampled.
4. To understand how the equilibrium theory of island biogeography can apply to the design of nature preserves.
5. To gain some familiarity with identification of leaf litter fauna.
Background
If Stafford County had some money to buy land for new parks, would you suggest that they spend it all on one big parcel or on several smaller ones having the same total area?
One of the primary purposes of national parks and other kinds of nature reserves is to protect and conserve biological diversity – different kinds of living things. And while we all agree that conserving biological diversity is a good thing, we also realize that doing so comes only at some cost – development, timber harvest, mining, etc. all promote economic well-being, at least over the short term. So we have to be able to give more practical advice to policy makers than “protect everything!” This two-week field/lab problem is meant to give you some basic background on species diversity and island biogeography, as well as to get you to think about the above problem. In doing so, you should see some important contributions that ecological theory can make to very practical problems. Such contributions form the basis of conservation biology.
To understand the factors affecting diversity, we must first decide how we’ll measure and analyze diversity. This lab will ask you to apply a few common approaches:
Species Richness (S): This is simply the number of different species present in a given area. This is a good first approximation to diversity, but it doesn’t allow us to distinguish between a community that has 10 species represented by 10 individuals each, and one that has one species represented by 91 individuals and nine other species represented by one individual each. To do that, ecologists have developed approaches that incorporate the “evenness” of abundances, because we feel that the former community is more “diverse.”
Shannon Index: Shannon’s index (H’) is a calculation that takes into account both the number of species found (S) and the “evenness” or “equitability” of distribution of total individuals among the species. Values of H’ tend to range between 1.5 (lower diversity) and 3.5 (higher diversity). The Shannon index is given by the equation: where , the proportion of total individuals in the sample made up by individuals of species i.
Dominance-diversity curves: A graphical way of representing species diversity is to plot the log of each species’ abundance vs. its rank (from most abundant to least abundant). If we had 10 species, represented by 100, 80, 53, 41, 35, 33, 29, 14, 9, and 6 individuals, respectively, our dominance-diversity curve would look like Figure 1. Though it doesn’t yield a simple number for comparison, this way of representing diversity conveys more information. Note that the greater the slope of the line, the less “even” the sample, and the smaller the slope, the more “even” the sample.
Applying island biogeography to forest litter communities
The Equilibrium Theory of Island Biogeography (MacArthur and Wilson 1967) predicts the species diversity of islands as a function of their size and distance from the mainland. Reserves are often isolated patches of natural habitat surrounded by human-altered landscapes (i.e., they are effectively islands). Animals living under cover objects are similarly isolated from similar habitats, so we can use them to consider how island biogeography might relate to reserves.
The essence of MacArthur and Wilson’s idea is simple. They assume that the number of species on an island is determined by a balance between the rate of immigration of new species from the “source pool” (generally the nearby mainland) and the rate of local extinction. Both processes are assumed to be continuous, with species continually going (locally) extinct and being replaced through immigration, although not necessarily by the same species. The balance of extinction and immigration results in an equilibrium species richness () for the island (Figure 2).
Consider immigration first. At first, the immigration rate will be high, since each new individual reaching the island will represent a new species. As more and more individuals arrive, however, fewer and fewer represent new species. The immigration rate reaches zero when all of the “source pool” species (i.e., those present on the adjacent mainland) are present on the island. Immigration rate should also vary as a function of the island’s isolation, i.e., its distance from the mainland. So the graph has two immigration curves – one for a near island and one for a far one.
Now consider extinction rate. It is bound to be zero when there are no species present, but will increase in proportion to the number of species already present, due to there being more opportunities for extinction and the exclusion of species that are poor competitors. Extinction should also be a function of island size, both because larger islands support larger populations, which makes them less vulnerable to “bad luck” extinction events, and because larger islands are likely to contain a greater diversity of habitats than small ones. We can now predict that:
1) Species richness will become roughly constant through time, even though there will be continual turnover in species composition. Thus, the equilibrium reached is dynamic rather than static.
2) Large islands should support more species than small islands.
3) Near islands (to the mainland source pool) should support more species than far islands.
There are lots of data from real communities that support the above predictions. The potential application of this for the design of nature reserves is not so simple, however, as highlighted by the “single large or several small” (SLOSS) debate on this issue. On the one hand, it seems very clear that we should expect a decline in species diversity when a patch of land is separated from the “mainland” by human-altered habitat, since distance from the mainland is by definition increased from zero. In addition, a larger preserve should support more species than a smaller one. On the other hand, if we consider the question of whether to make a single large reserve or several smaller ones with the same total area, things get complicated. Small reserves might be more insulated against the spread of an epidemic disease. Small reserves might also allow for survival of poor competitor species in patches that just happen (by chance) to be without superior competitors. Similarly, small reserves might allow for the survival of prey species in patches that happen to lack major predators (Huffaker 1958). Given these tradeoffs, it’s clear that island biogeography theory shouldn’t be the sole factor in designing reserves. Other factors, like the biological needs of all the species involved and the physical features (e.g., topography, habitat diversity, spatial position) of the land in question, must also be considered. Procedure for week 1
We’re going to survey the animal community living under fallen logs and compare it to the community found in nearby open areas that lack a distinct cover item. The procedure is simple: you will flip the log and count and/or collect all the animals you find living within its footprint. You may use hands, forceps, aspirators, or nets to capture animals. Physical variables to collect for each log will include the length and width of the item (in meters), its proximity to the nearest other cover item (also in meters), and any other characteristics that seem relevant. You will then repeat that procedure in a nearby uncovered area that is a similar distance from neighboring logs. Our goal is for each group to survey at least three log-open site pairs. Aim to include both logs that are “isolated” (>3 m from another cover item) and “well-connected” (<1 m from another item) in your samples. To be confident of our identifications, we will collect examples of each invertebrate we find, and take photos of any vertebrates we find. Be sure to keep samples from each site separate and label them appropriately. We will complete identification of the samples in week 2.
Procedure for week 2
Your goal this week is to identify as many distinct “morphospecies” as you can within your samples. While it would be good to identify each animal to species, it is more important for our purposes is to accurately assess how many distinct taxa are present in the samples. As a result, you may identify species as “red centipede” or “striped brown spider” as you go. The key is for the names used by each group to be consistent. To encourage consistency, we will maintain a collection of examples of each species we identify. Before you record an animal as a new morphospecies, check whether that animal has already been given a name in the collection. Enter your group’s data into the Excel template your instructor provided and email it to them. As you're identifying and recording the morphospecies present in your sample, give some thought to the trophic habits (i.e., detritivore (consumer of rotting vegetation, bacteria, fungi, etc.), herbivore (living plants), or carnivore (other animals)) of each species encountered. Doing so will help you to interpret your results (e.g., you might find that spiders, which are carnivores, correlate with high diversity under a log). Write-up: Use the full class data for your Figures.
1. Use island biogeography theory[1] to form good scientific hypotheses for each of the following questions. Remember that good hypotheses are testable explanations for an observation.
How will the species diversity under large items differ from smaller ones?
How will the species diversity under isolated items differ from more-connected ones?
How will the species diversity and trophic habits of animals in “under log” samples differ from “open” samples?
2. For two samples, __CH1c____ and_____TS2c_, show how you’d calculate S and H’. Compare your results to the values your instructor calculated for those samples. The following example should help: Suppose our samples contained 400 individuals in 10 species, and that taxa 1 through 10 were represented by 100, 80, 53, 41, 35, 33, 29, 14, 9 and 6 individuals, respectively. Table 1: Sample calculation of Shannon index (H’)
3. Figure 1: Plot the relationship of the Shannon index (y-axis) versus the area of cover item for each sample. For this and the other figures, you can plot the “under log” and “open” samples as different plots, or as two data series on the same plot.
4. Figure 2: Plot the relationship of the Shannon index (y-axis) versus the “isolation” (distance from nearest cover item) for each sample. 5. Figure 3: Make dominance-diversity curves for “covered” and “open” samples. Place the log (Abundance) for each species on the y-axis, and the species’ rank in terms of abundance on the x-axis. To make this plot, you’ll first have to sort the data with the most common species [2] first and the rarest species last. 6. Do Figures 1 and 2 support the predictions from island biogeography theory (see #1A and #1B)? Explain.
7. Do the data in Figure 3 support your hypothesis in #1C? Describe the ecological reasons (not methodological or error[3] ) why you think the dominance- diversity curves are different (if they are) for “under log” and “open” samples. Be sure to compare both the richness and evenness of the samples. Consider things like: degree of isolation from similar habitat, rate of desiccation of habitat, abundance or lack of food, abundance or lack of predators, abundance or lack of plants, etc. Be specific and refer to the names of actual taxa, rather than generalizing over all species. Spiders are very different ecologically from roaches!
References
Diamond, J.M., and R.M. May. 1981. Island biogeography and the design of natural reserves. Pages 228-252 In R.M. May, editor. Theoretical ecology: principles and applications. Blackwell scientific publications, Oxford, U.K.
Dunn, G.A. and D.K. Dunn. 1998. The insect identification guide. Fourth edition. Special Publication No. 6 of the Young Entomologists' Society, Inc., 1915 Peggy Place, Lansing, MI 48910-2553.
Gibb, T., & Oseto, C. (2010). Arthropod Collection and Identification: Laboratory and Field Techniques. Burlington: Elsevier Science.
Harris, L.D. 1984. The fragmented forest: island biogeography theory and the preservation of biotic diversity. Univ. of Chicago press, Chicago, IL.
Huffaker, C.B. 1958. Experimental studies on predation: dispersion factors and predator-prey oscillations. Hilgardia 27: 343-383.
Knowlton, N. 2001. Coral reef biodiversity – habitat size matters. Science 292: 1493-1495.
MacArthur, R.H. 1965. Patterns of species diversity. Biological Review 40: 510-533.
MacArthur, R.H., and E.O. Wilson. 1967. The theory of island biogeography. Princeton Univ. Press, Princeton, NJ.
Meffe, G.K., and C.R. Carroll, eds. 1994. Principles of conservation biology. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland , MA.
Simberloff, D., and L.G. Abele. 1976. Island biogeography theory and conservation practice. Science 191: 285-286.
Simberloff, D., and L.G. Abele. 1982. Refuge design and island biogeography theory: effects of fragmentation. American Naturalist 120: 41-50.
Watchman, L., M. Groom and J.D. Perrine. 2001. Science and uncertainty in habitat conservation planning. American Scientist 89: 351-359.
Explanations for your hypotheses should be based in IBT, especially in A and B
Note that the rankings will be different for the Covered and Open samples. In other words, you'll have to sort those data separately.
Not measurement error!